Hermie Bruno

Hermie Bruno

Hermie Bruno’s recent works depict narratives of communal Igorot society. A devout Christian raised in the mining town of Itogon, Benguet, his textured paintings are representations of what he observes are similarities between Christian values and indigenous practices.

He began his art practice after he sold his first painting at the age of 17. He eventually quit university as it took a financial toll on his family. In the next three years, he joined Art Galleria (then housed at the Baguio Convention Center), facilitating art workshops while exploring painting techniques without the convenience of a well-stocked studio. Experimentation with limited resources led him to use canvas lint to add texture to his figurative paintings. This passion for texture is influenced by other Cordilleran artists like Jeff Cablog.

After leaving Art Galleria, Hermie found himself a mentor in the artist Joe Abawag. The friendship led both of them to show works in numerous exhibitions around Baguio City and Metro Manila. In February 2019, Bruno opened his first solo exhibition about Igorot farmers called “Highlander” at the Baguio Museum.

Hermie’s other bodies of work are quaint autobiographical portraits of his childhood and his subsequent marriage and family life. In a series of paintings called “Bond between Father and Child,” he looked back at his unaffectionate relationship with his father and the change he perceived as he himself took on the role of fatherhood.